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Introduction

Using an Evidence-based Approach to Making Patient Recommendations for Power Toothbrushes

COURSE NUMBER: 648

Jane L. Forrest, EdD, BSDH; Lesley McGovern Kupiec, RDH, MSDH

Credit Hours:

3 Hour(s)

PDF

Patients are more educated and asking more questions about their oral health. Dental professionals today can be overwhelmed by the number and variety of toothbrushes regularly surfacing on the market and the many differing technologies. All...

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Overview

Patients are more educated and asking more questions about their oral health. Dental professionals today can be overwhelmed by the number and variety of toothbrushes regularly surfacing on the market and the many differing technologies. All of these advances oblige dental professionals to seek information that will enable them to make the best product recommendations based on proven clinical effectiveness and gentleness, their own clinical experience, and patient preferences.


Power or electric* toothbrushes are designed to facilitate the removal of bacterial plaque and food debris from the teeth and gingiva and to reduce calculus and stain accumulation. With technology constantly improving, there are more options than ever for consumers when it comes to purchasing electric toothbrushes. Several distinct electric toothbrush technologies with differing modes of action are commercially available, and many offer compliance-enhancing features. The current generation of marketed power toothbrushes has been shown to be safe and efficacious. The trouble is that obtaining information today is easy, however growing misinformation creates mistrust and muddies the water between fact and fiction. Consequently, it continues to be necessary for dental professionals to know what products are currently available and keep up-to-date on what the science says in order to provide consumers with accurate information so that they can make the most appropriate evidence based decisions for their own health.


*The terms ‘power’ and ‘electric’ are used interchangeably. Early toothbrush models were referred to as electric. The use of the term ‘electric’ then transitioned to the term ‘power.’ The trend appears to be going back to the term electric. You will see both terms used in this course, depending on the referenced studies and published articles. Also, ‘powered’ toothbrush is sometimes used as the umbrella term for battery operated or electric toothbrushes.

  • Intended Audience:

    Dental Assistant Students, Dental Assistants, Dental Hygiene Students, Dental Hygienists, Dental Students, Dentists

  • Date Course Online:

    Nov. 23, 2020

  • Last Revision Date:

    NA

  • Course Expiration Date:

    Mar. 31, 2024

  • Cost:

    Free

  • Method:

    Self-instructional

  • AGD Subject Code(s):

    10

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the dental professional should be able to:


  • Discuss the evolution of power/electric toothbrushes.
  • Understand the different electric toothbrush technologies.
  • Describe how different toothbrush technologies effect plaque, gingivitis, calculus and stain.
  • Discuss the oral safety considerations of electric toothbrushes.
  • Discuss evidence-based decision-making concepts and the hierarchy of evidence.
  • Describe the basis for professional recommendation of electric toothbrushes.
  • Summarize research presented on patient compliance with brushing recommendations.
  • Identify instructional videos for different electric toothbrushes.

Disclaimers

  • P&G is providing these resource materials to dental professionals. We do not own this content nor are we responsible for any material herein.
  • Participants must always be aware of the hazards of using limited knowledge in integrating new techniques or procedures into their practice. Only sound evidence-based dentistry should be used in patient therapy.

Note:  Registration is required to take test.

Author(s)

Conflict of Interest Disclosure Statement

  • Ms. Lesley Kupiec worked part-time as a dental hygiene educator for P&G and is a member of the P&G Oral Care Global Dental Hygiene Advisory Board. She has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.
  • Dr. Jane Forrest has done consulting work for P&G and is a member of the P&G Oral Care Global Dental Hygiene Advisory Board. She has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.
Jane L. Forrest

Jane L. Forrest

EdD, BSDH

Dr. Forrest is the Chair of the Behavioral Science Section in the Division of Dental Public Health & Pediatric Dentistry, and the Director of the National Center for Dental Hygiene Research & Practice at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC...

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Lesley McGovern Kupiec

Lesley McGovern Kupiec

RDH, MSDH

Recognition

AGD Pace Logo

Approved PACE Program Provider

THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY


Nationally Approved PACE Program Provider for FAGD/MAGD credit.

Approval does not imply acceptance by any regulatory authority or AGD endorsement.


8/1/2021 to 7/31/2027


Provider ID# 211886